Barn Burning By William Faulkner Literary Analysis

Barn Burning By William Faulkner Literary Analysis-89
A silent and sullen man, he walks with a limp, a significant factor when we learn later that he received the wound while stealing horses — and not necessarily the enemy's — during the Civil War.We also discover that Harris' barn is not the first barn that he has burned.This suggests that the Author was trying to give the readers an image of Abner Snopes being someone who lacked human qualities.

A silent and sullen man, he walks with a limp, a significant factor when we learn later that he received the wound while stealing horses — and not necessarily the enemy's — during the Civil War.We also discover that Harris' barn is not the first barn that he has burned.This suggests that the Author was trying to give the readers an image of Abner Snopes being someone who lacked human qualities.

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His father tries to manipulate him by continuously explaining to him the importance of family loyalty, yet Sartoris’s conscious doesn’t agree with everything his father has to do or say.

Sartoris’s worldview and morality was for more mature than that of his brothers’ who lacks the will power to stand up to his father. Destiny plays out and eventually Abner Snopes gets into his another argument and confrontation has begun.

Snopes never burns farm houses, and while we might initially conclude that this restraint is proof that Snopes isn't wholly incorrigible, we soon learn that on farms, barns are more important than houses because they hold livestock and oftentimes harvested crops, which provide the money and food that farmers and their families need to survive. ." Sarty cannot complete his thought that his father is not only a barn burner, but that he has been one for so long that before he burns down one barn, he has "already arranged to make a crop on another farm before he . ." Again, Sarty severs his thought before he comes to the logical conclusion. burnt down the barn." Following the courtroom scene, Snopes loads his family into a wagon, headed for another farm on which to work.

Farms can thrive without houses, but they are doomed to fail without barns. Although he knows that his father is a barn burner, Sarty fights the boys to defend his father's integrity, while hoping fervently that his father will stop burning barns: "Forever he thought. He cannot bring himself to finish the sentence, which presumably would end, "before he . That night at a makeshift camp, he calls for Sarty to join him in a walk, and their ensuing conversation elaborates again the theme of family loyalty versus truth and justice.

This conflict is vividly illustrated by having a young 10-year-old boy — Sarty — confront this dilemma as part of his initiation into manhood.

Young Sarty has a choice: He can be loyal to his father, his blood relative, or he can do what he innately senses is right.At the end of the story, this is Sarty's dilemma — he has no place to go and no one to turn to. Harris had warned Snopes to keep his hog out of the farmer's cornfield, and he had even given Snopes enough wire to pen the hog; after the hog escaped yet again into Harris' field, the farmer kept the hog and charged Snopes a dollar for "pound fee"; Snopes paid the fee and sent word to Harris that "wood and hay kin burn." Because there is no proof — other than this enigmatic message — that Snopes is responsible for burning the barn, the judge is legally forced to find him innocent.The opening of "Barn Burning" emphasizes the antithetical loyalties that confront Sarty. However, he warns Snopes to leave the county and not come back.The setting is a makeshift court for a Justice of the Peace, for Abner Snopes has been accused of burning Mr. Immediately, Sarty is convinced that the people in the court are his and his father's enemies. The courtroom scene and the following fight outside between Sarty and some boys underscore Sarty's predicament.He fiercely aligns himself with a loyalty to blood and kin, as opposed to the justice of the court: ". Called to testify during the hearing, he is about to confess his father's guilt when the judge dismisses him; yet, when he is outside the courtroom and hears the boys calling his father a barn burner, he comes immediately to his father's defense, engaging them in a fight during which he sheds his own blood to protect his father's — and his own — name.Abner snopes ruins a rug with manure and is told to clean it.He tries but the rug is ruined beyond repair so he is ordered to make a payment.Realizing that Sarty was going to tell the Justice of the Peace the truth about the barn burning, Abner slaps his son in a dispassionate manner much like he earlier whipped the mules that pulled the wagon — "without heat." He warns Sarty about the importance of family and explains that none of the men in the courtroom would have defended him.Fearful of his father's abusive behavior, Sarty knows that it is useless to respond: "If I had said they wanted only truth, justice, he would have hit me again." The campfire episode is also important because it affords Faulkner the opportunity to explain to us why Snopes burns barns.He pours kerosene into a container and demands his son Sartoris to fetch him the oil.Instead he manages to escape and warn the owners of the barn of what is going on and his father is shot and killed.

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